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Chukat

  
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 19:4
 19:5
 19:6
19:5 The cow shall then be burned in [Eleazar's] presence. Its skin, flesh, blood and entrails must be burned.
Vesaraf et-haparah le'eynav et-orah ve'et-bsarah ve'et-damah al-pirshah yisrof.
19:6 The priest shall take a piece of cedar wood, some hyssop, and some crimson [wool], and throw it into the burning cow.
Velakach hakohen ets erez ve'ezov ushni tola'at vehishlich el-toch srefat haparah.



Commentary:

burned
  By a priest (Yad, Parah Adumah 1:11).

cedar wood
  See Leviticus 14:4. This had to be taken from the trunk of the tree (Sifri Zuta; Adereth Eliahu). Some say that it had to be at least one handbreadth long (Midrash HaGadol).

hyssop
  See Exodus 12:22. It also had to be at least one handbreadth long (Niddah 26a; Yad, Parah Adumah 3:2). Some sources appear to indicate that three branches were required (Sifri; Toledoth Adam ad loc.; Malbim).

crimson wool
  See Exodus 25:4, Leviticus 14:4. The piece of wool had to weigh at least 5 shekels (4 oz.). It was used to tie the hyssop and cedar together (Yoma 42a; Yad, Parah Adumah 3:4).

burning cow
  When the heat of the fire caused the belly of the cow to burst, the above articles would be thrown into the body cavity (Targum Yonathan; Parah 3:10; Sifri; Yad, Parah Adumah 3:4).





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